Title IX, Harassment, Bullying, and Illegal Acts

In 2011, an important and still relevant article was written by Nan Stein, Ed.D. & Kelly A Mennemeier, B.A., “Addressing the Gendered Dimensions of Harassment and Bullying: What domestic and sexual violence advocates need to know.” The point of the article was that in the recent wave of concern over bullying, the concept of harassment is often folded into this. The problem with folding these two issues together is that there are federal bans on discrimination in education, bans that already include harassment.

The problem is, in the pressure over bullying, the stronger tool of the federal law prohibitions against discrimination are often ignored. Citing an Office of Civil Rights “Dear Colleague” letter to school districts across the country, the article points out:

The label (used by the School District) used to describe an incident (e.g., bullying, hazing, teasing) does not determine how a school is obligated to respond. Rather, the nature of the conduct itself must be assessed for civil rights implications. So, for example, if the abusive behavior is on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, or disability, and creates a hostile environment, a school is obligated to respond in accordance with the applicable federal civil rights statutes and regulations enforced by OCR

The article discusses how state laws can vary. In Washington, our anti-bullying law contains an anti-harassment provision, making it even more likely that civil rights violations will be lumped into the general policy of bullying. For example, I was looking at the website for Bainbridge Island Schools. On that they reference a case, Webster v. Bainbridge Island School District, Kitsap County Sup. Ct. Cause No. 10-2-00346-2. In the Supplemental Letter to Verdict provided by the School District, it is clear that Title IX issues came up (the Title IX claim was dismissedby the court because it did not find, “deliberate indifference” but the special verdict form found the school district negligent.  In the thoughtful press release of November 6, 2013, the link provided by the school district is the report form for Harassment, Intimidation, and Bullying.

On the “For Families Directory” there is no information about Title IX. In fact, when doing a search for “Title IX” in the menu bar the search result returns, “There are no records.” A search for Title IX without quotes returns a few items, but nothing about Title IX. This is with a school district that has been found negligent and is attempting to remedy issues. While I only looked at Bainbridge Island for this particular post, I have no doubt that if I looked at other school districts it would be the exception that provides a clear explanation of when students behaviors violate state laws, when they violate federal laws, and when they are criminal behaviors.